Newsroom

NAAF Hunger Survey

The Native American Agriculture Fund is conducting a research study to gain a better perspective on the issues of food insecurity and hunger in Tribal households as a result of COVID-19. This survey will be available until April 30th.

 

During that time, we are hoping to collect a large number of responses from Tribal members and communities. At the end of the survey collection period, we will analyze the data and provide a report highlighting the insights we gain from our willing participants.

This survey will keep your identity anonymous and takes approximately fifteen minutes to complete. The Native American Agriculture Fund will maintain the data collected and use it to inform the further strengthening and support the critical role Native agriculturalists have in feeding our people.

 

Thank you for taking the time to contribute to this survey!

 

If you have any questions please contact Valerie Segrest (Muckleshoot), Senior Program Officer at vsegrest@nativeamericanagriculturefund.org

 

The Native American Agriculture Fund Statement on Supporting BIPOC Farmers and Ranchers

Fayetteville, Arkansas- A decade ago, the Keepseagle v. Vilsack case was originally settled. The case was brought by Native farmers and ranchers throughout the US to address a decades long history of discrimination in lending and in the servicing of loans by USDA.  The settlement of the case had many aspects including the creation of the Native American Agriculture Fund. But the Fund cannot address all the issues the federal government can.

As the COVID-19 pandemic sweeps across the land and creates emergencies in its wake, we see that systemic and persistent barriers continue to leave people out. When USDA deployed boxes of food, Tribal governments and Native food businesses were all but left out of the program. Nearly 97% of USDA-deployed resources went to non-BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) agriculturalists. These issues need to be addressed.

We need meaningful and deliberate action. The burden of debt is hitting every corner of our economy. But for BIPOC farmers and ranchers it is an emergency made even more dire because of the historic barriers faced in accessing government programs. Technical support is important to all farmers and ranchers but is even more important to those who have been left out of those resources for decades. We need to think more deeply, act more deliberately, and ensure people have a meaningful opportunity to receive the support they need to stay on the land and engaged in agriculture.

Agriculture in the US is going to need every single person we can find to embrace the act of feeding our people.  We need the agriculturalists of tomorrow to be as diverse as our country. Most farmers and ranchers have absolutely no problem helping out their fellow farmers and ranchers, whether they live down the road or across the country. Most often, the fights against change come from folks who do not work the land. Those whose passion is food and agriculture know that BIPOC farmers and ranchers should be just as supported as others.

We need BIPOC farmers and ranchers fully involved in the acts of feeding us all.  Without them we are weaker. We need to do everything we can to address injustices and unfairness in these systems and set things right.

The Native American Agriculture Fund Supports Deb Haaland as Secretary of the Interior

(Monday evening in Washington, D.C., IllumiNative put up a projection of Rep. Deb Haaland on the C Street entrance of the Department of the Interior. (Photo courtesy IllumiNative)
Fayetteville, Arkansas- The Native American Agriculture Fund lends our full support for the confirmation of Congresswoman Deb Haaland of Laguna Pueblo on her confirmation to be Secretary of the Interior. If confirmed, Haaland will be the first ever Native American woman to serve as a cabinet secretary.
Haaland has deep roots in Native agriculture and understands the intricacies of producing food on Tribal lands. As a small business owner, she knows what our Native farmers and ranchers face when bringing their goods to market. She recognizes the role the Bureau of Indian Affairs plays in creating economic development on Indian Reservations and how food can build rural economies. With Haaland at the helm at the Department of the Interior, the federal government will have a leader with the lived experience to lead our rural economies into a brighter future.
“Deb Haaland is an incredible choice to lead the Department of the Interior,” said Janie Hipp (Chickasaw), CEO of the Native American Agriculture Fund. “She brings decades of solid and informed experience to the position and knows what it takes to build strong, local food economies that will sustain our communities and feed our people.”
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Standing Rock Rancher Runs Nation’s Largest Native-Owned Buffalo Herd

“Today, the Brownotter Buffalo Ranch on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation sprawls over 20,000 acres, home to a herd of 600. His herd is part of a buffalo resurgence at Standing Rock that also includes native herds owned by the tribe and others.”

READ THE ARTICLE ON CAPJOURNAL.COM:

https://www.capjournal.com/news/standing-rock-rancher-runs-nation-s-largest-native-owned-buffalo-herd/article_67a4d7c6-461e-11ea-a97a-634e86e1841e.html

NAAF LISTENING SESSION February 18th, 2021

The Native American Agriculture Fund (NAAF) would like to invite you to a listening session on February 18th, 2021 at 2pm Central Time. This inagural session begins a series of sessions which will be held the 3rd Thursday of every month throughout the year. This listening session is an opportunity for NAAF to listen to Indian Country. In addition, we will have an opportunity for participants to ask questions regarding the NAAF organization. This is open to the public.

REGISTRATION IS LIMITED, SO PLEASE REGISTER ASAP

Additional Listening Session Dates:

April 15th, 2021
June 17th, 2021
August 19th, 2021
October 21, 2021
December 16th, 2021

NATIVE AGRICULTURE TAXES & FINANCIAL TOOLKIT

 In today’s challenging farm financial climate, having a positive lender relationship is key for farmers and ranchers. How can you be best prepared to work with your lender? Join this series of webinars to learn how to be well prepared for lender meetings, thus cultivating a positive borrower relationship. We will cover preparing a balance sheet to convey your financial position; understanding the Sch. F tax form to share farm profitability; and telling your story to your lender, preparing a cash flow plan and other business planning tools.
WEBINAR RECORDING:

The Native American Agriculture Fund applauds the steps taken by USDA to Temporarily Suspend Debt Collections and Foreclosures on Distressed Farm Loans

Fayetteville, Arkansas-The US Department of Agriculture announced it was temporarily suspending debt collections and foreclosures for distressed borrowers under programs administered by the Farm Service Agency due to the national public health emergency caused by COVID-19.
“This is an important step that can help alleviate significant levels of stress on the agriculture sector – and more importantly on those who get up every morning to feed the rest of us,” said Janie Hipp (Chickasaw), CEO of the Native American Agriculture Fund. “This action will give our nation’s agricultural producers the breathing room they need to continue on in the midst of this global pandemic. Our rural and remote reservation and agricultural communities in Indian Country will rest a little easier because of this important step taken by USDA.”
“In the past, we had to push hard on USDA to consider such actions to help producers,” Hipp continued. “Today, we are seeing USDA proactively take these steps to give folks the breathing room they need to readjust their operations and survive to farm and ranch another day. We look forward to updates in the future and other actions like this to proactively help our nation’s farmers, ranchers and dedicated food champions.”
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NATIVE AMERICAN PRODUCERS FINANCE TOOLKIT SERIES

In today’s challenging farm financial climate, having a positive lender relationship is key for farmers and ranchers.  How can you be best prepared to work with your lender?  Join this series of webinars to learn how to be well prepared for lender meetings, thus cultivating a positive borrower relationship.  We will cover preparing a balance sheet to convey your financial position; understanding the Sch. F tax form to show farm profitability; and telling your story to your lender, preparing a cash flow plan and other business planning tools, share farm profitability and ensure full access to farm programs.

Topic: Native American Producers Finance Toolkit Series
Time: Jan 27, 2021 02:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)
Every week on Wed, until Feb 10, 2021, 3 occurrence(s)
Jan 27, 2021 02:00 PM
Feb 3, 2021 02:00 PM
Feb 10, 2021 02:00 PM
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Native American Agriculture Fund Partners with the National Agriculture in the Classroom Organization

Fayetteville, Arkansas- The Native American Agriculture Fund (NAAF) is pleased to announce that it has recently partnered with the National Agriculture in the Classroom Organization (NAITCO) and its Agriculture in the Classroom (AITC) program members to strengthen pre-kindergarten (Pre-K) through 12th grade agricultural literacy outreach to educators serving Native American communities.
NAAF will work with NAITCO to increase the number of teachers who are working with Native students who will attend the 2021 NAITCO conference “Fields of Dreams” June 28-July 1 in Des Moines, Iowa. The conference provides important professional development opportunities for teachers throughout the country. The teachers who will come to the conference will hear from Dr. Anton Treuer, professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University, who has authored many books throughout his career. His career has been dedicated to equity, education, and cultural work; his keynote address will be: “Transformative Teaching: How to Infuse Equity Tools in Your Classroom Delivery.”
NAAF’s partnership with NAITCO will also encompass working on Native farming articles for the AgMag publication that is part of Agriculture in the Classroom work that reaches Native communities. Focusing on creating unique opportunities to reach Native communities through teacher professional development and special publications can have the combined impact of strengthening NAITC’s work in Native communities.
“With partners like the Native American Agriculture Fund, we are able to reach more teachers and more Native students, aiding NAAF in its efforts to create Native American youth leaders in the agriculture sector,” said Tammy Maxey, president of NAITCO and programs director of Virginia Agriculture in the Classroom.
“Educating youth about the value and role of agriculture, and careers in agriculture in their communities is critical,” said Janie Simms Hipp (Chickasaw), chief executive officer of NAAF. “We are pleased to work with NAITCO and assist in our joint efforts to encourage more agriculture-focused educational resources available to Native K-12 students and to assist in supporting teachers of Native students, who are such a critical link.”
NAITCO is a non-profit organization made up of AITC programs in 50 states including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Its mission is to educate teachers and students in Pre-K-12 about the importance of agriculture by incorporating agricultural concepts into classroom instruction. NAITCO and its AITC state program members reached 87,000 teachers and 8.2 million students in 2019. To learn more about NAITCO, please visit www.agclassroom.org.
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